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Troubles in the North resulted in the refusal of Shannon Airport maintenance workers to service British planes following the 1972 murder of thirteen Derry civilians.

Clare although unburdened geographically by the war in the North between Catholics and Protestants, was tied through matters of the heart to their fellow countrymen in the struggle against the British across the six counties.

In 1972, the closure of all premises was sanctioned by the Ennis Chamber of Commerce to mourn the murder of Thirteen civilians in Derry by the British paratroopers. Feelings of shock and disgust were widespread across the county.

Men stepped away from their jobs for the day and took to the streets in protest against the actions of the British military.

Industry was affected in the county as maintenance workers in Shannon Airport refused to service British planes. A parade was led from Éire Óg GAA club to the Cathedral, where people of all ages wedged inside to pay their respects to the innocent and deceased.

The procession was a highly decorated affair, with members of various political parties speckled amongst the many vital members of the Ennis community. Community breakdown was lamented at the mass and a need for an Irish nation to pull together was reiterated. In order to soften the edges and smooth out the creases that tarnish the sacred tricolour.

With the benefit of hindsight, we know that there were many more years of hardship to come and come they did.

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